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Hi Chris, "Good content" means a couple of things - good for readers and good for Google. Good content for readers means that the content answers questions, provides value, offers solutions, and is engaging. You want to keep the reader on the page and on your website for as long as possible. To make good content for Google, you have to provide the search engine with a set of signals - e.g., keywords, backlinks, low bounce rates, etc... The idea is that if you make good content for readers (engaging, valuable, actionable, and informative), your content will get more engagement. When your content gets more engagement Google will see it as good content too and put it higher in the SERPs. Making "good content" is about striking that balance. Let us know if that answered your question!
Direct traffic is defined as visits with no referring website. When a visitor follows a link from one website to another, the site of origin is considered the referrer. These sites can be search engines, social media, blogs, or other websites that have links to other websites. Direct traffic categorizes visits that do not come from a referring URL.

You write a blog post about your infographic generator, and included a link to the tool in the post so people can try it for themselves. Let's say the visitor-to-lead conversion rate is the same on this blog post as it was in your PPC campaign -- 2%. That means if 100 people read that blog post in your first month, you'd get two leads from it. But your work is done now. And over time, that one blog post you wrote years ago will continue to generate leads over, and over, and over, every single month. And not just that blog post -- every blog post you write will do the same.


Improving the time spent on the site, after a user has reached a page in your site or online store, increasing the number of pages viewed in a session and lowering the bounce rate, can be a clear sign that it provides a pleasant experience for those who visit your site. After this you need to improve conversion, what the users do on your site after they get there, basically from here, the entire ordering process begins. 
Content marketing requires manpower, so the first step is figuring out who is going to head up the program. There's no one-size-fits-all for team structure -- it depends largely on the size of your company, your marketing team, and your budget. But if we assume that those three things are interlinked, as they often are, I can provide you with some frameworks based off of other content marketing-focused companies' structures. These should help you hire the right people, and have them "sitting" in the right spot in your organization.
There are a host of metrics to look at when you have a robust analytics solution, but having too many goals to live up to tends to result in prioritization difficulties. I recommend content marketing teams have 2-3 metrics they measure, and perhaps some secondary metrics each sub-team can measure to help understand when there are different levers to pull. Here are my recommendations:
When the marketing team starts to grow, who leads content marketing gets more interesting. With a team of three marketers, you can approach content marketing a couple ways. Either one person can own content marketing activities, while the other two own activities that align more with the middle- and bottom-of the funnel. Or, two people can own content marketing activities, while the third owns the rest.
There are many firms that offer content marketing services, often paired with SEO or PR. If you’re simply too busy to do it yourself and aren’t ready to manage it in-house, then hiring a firm may be your best option. But if you want to jump in and do your own content marketing the easiest way is to start blogging. It will likely be hard at first, but the more you do it, the better you’ll get at it. Following tips from websites like Copyblogger you’ll quickly learn how to craft content for your website or blog that will engage readers and turn them into customers or clients. But while technically good writing and the right headlines can help, it’s not the key to creating great content that is the best form of content marketing.
There are a host of metrics to look at when you have a robust analytics solution, but having too many goals to live up to tends to result in prioritization difficulties. I recommend content marketing teams have 2-3 metrics they measure, and perhaps some secondary metrics each sub-team can measure to help understand when there are different levers to pull. Here are my recommendations:
Organic website traffic/visitor is one of the SEO lethal weapons for increasing the website’s popularity. Buy website traffic to get more conversion when your site is listed on page 1 of Search Engines. Get website traffic from visitors that are very interested in your niches / targeted keywords. This will make your keywords and website considered more valuable by Major Search Engines.
Advertising account managers typically require a bachelor’s degree in marketing, advertising, or journalism. Other important college courses will include visual art and graphic design, persuasive communication, market research, and consumer behavior. Before managing accounts, managers will have several years experience in researching, designing and purchasing ads, often getting their initial experience as an intern between (or during) semesters in school.
Cheese for a cause! Join us on Thursday, June 22nd for a cheesy soiree to raise money to honor Daphne Zepos, a trailblazer in the global cheese community. We’re hosting a cheese tasting party to raise money for the DZTA, which is a scholarship created in her memory. The DZTA helps to grow squads of cheese professionals who teach about the history, culture and techniques in making, aging and selling cheese – a cause near and dear to our hearts! Tickets are $40 for one, or $75 if you buy a pair.
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