For a long time, digital marketers summed up the properties of direct and organic traffic pretty simply. To most, organic traffic consists of visits from search engines, while direct traffic is made up of visits from people entering your company URL into their browser. This explanation, however, is too simple and leaves most digital marketers short-handed when it comes to completely understanding and gaining insights from web traffic, especially organic and direct sources.
Cheese for a cause! Join us on Thursday, June 22nd for a cheesy soiree to raise money to honor Daphne Zepos, a trailblazer in the global cheese community. We’re hosting a cheese tasting party to raise money for the DZTA, which is a scholarship created in her memory. The DZTA helps to grow squads of cheese professionals who teach about the history, culture and techniques in making, aging and selling cheese – a cause near and dear to our hearts! Tickets are $40 for one, or $75 if you buy a pair.

Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.


Cheese for a cause! Join us on Thursday, June 22nd for a cheesy soiree to raise money to honor Daphne Zepos, a trailblazer in the global cheese community. We’re hosting a cheese tasting party to raise money for the DZTA, which is a scholarship created in her memory. The DZTA helps to grow squads of cheese professionals who teach about the history, culture and techniques in making, aging and selling cheese – a cause near and dear to our hearts! Tickets are $40 for one, or $75 if you buy a pair.

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There are a host of metrics to look at when you have a robust analytics solution, but having too many goals to live up to tends to result in prioritization difficulties. I recommend content marketing teams have 2-3 metrics they measure, and perhaps some secondary metrics each sub-team can measure to help understand when there are different levers to pull. Here are my recommendations:
The personal finance site Mint.com used content marketing, specifically their personal finance blog MintLife, to build an audience for a product they planned to sell. According to entrepreneur Sachin Rekhi, Mint.com concentrated on building the audience for MintLife "independent of the eventual Mint.com product."[18] Content on the blog included how to guides on paying for college, saving for a house, and getting out of debt. Other popular content included in-depth interview and a series of financial disasters called "Trainwreck Tuesdays." Popularity of the site surged as did demand for the product. "Mint grew quickly enough to sell to Intuit for $170 million after three years in business. By 2013, the tool reached 10 million users, many of whom trusted Mint to handle their sensitive banking information because of the blog’s smart, helpful content."[19]

A marketing program will also train you how to better understand your customers and their needs. Economics courses will teach you about identifying and responding to supply and demand, while courses in market research will teach you how to segment consumers and identify market opportunities. Courses in consumer behavior will train you to predict how customers will respond to different strategies, as you seek to promote your (or your client’s) business. (See also Consumer Psychology)

The personal finance site Mint.com used content marketing, specifically their personal finance blog MintLife, to build an audience for a product they planned to sell. According to entrepreneur Sachin Rekhi, Mint.com concentrated on building the audience for MintLife "independent of the eventual Mint.com product."[18] Content on the blog included how to guides on paying for college, saving for a house, and getting out of debt. Other popular content included in-depth interview and a series of financial disasters called "Trainwreck Tuesdays." Popularity of the site surged as did demand for the product. "Mint grew quickly enough to sell to Intuit for $170 million after three years in business. By 2013, the tool reached 10 million users, many of whom trusted Mint to handle their sensitive banking information because of the blog’s smart, helpful content."[19]

Another idea for fun family things to do in Dallas is to visit one of the several amusement and water parks that Dallas has to offer. If you’re looking for something a little more exciting than a trip to the zoo, then you could spend the day riding rides and rollercoaster at Six Flags Over Texas in nearby Arlington. You and your family are sure to have an unforgettable time at Six Flags or any of the other water and amusement parks in Dallas, and you might just decide to spend most of your time there.
At this stage of growth, it's also time to assign dedicated leadership to your content marketing team -- unless you want two dozen people reporting to the CMO. Many organizations hire a Director of Content, VP of Content, Chief Content Officer, or Editor-in-Chief to lead the entire content marketing team. This individual sets the vision for the team, secures budget, hires the right talent, contributes content ideas, solves for growth, and helps coordinate with other leaders across the marketing organization so content marketing doesn't become too siloed.
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