The term “organic traffic” is used for referring to the visitors that land on your website as a result of unpaid (“organic”) search results. Organic traffic is the opposite of paid traffic, which defines the visits generated by paid ads. Visitors who are considered organic find your website after using a search engine like Google or Bing, so they are not “referred” by any other website.
Unlike other forms of online marketing, content marketing relies on anticipating and meeting an existing customer need for information, as opposed to creating demand for a new need. As James O'Brien of Contently wrote on Mashable, "The idea central to content marketing is that a brand must give something valuable to get something valuable in return. Instead of the commercial, be the show. Instead of the banner ad, be the feature story."[3] Content marketing requires continuous delivery of large amounts of content, preferably within a content marketing strategy.[4]
You need to know very well the market you activate in and understand the needs of the clients to offer them what they want. You must provide detailed and concrete information about what the product or offer provides. Creating content optimized for organic traffic and on the right topic will bring quality visitors that will convert in leads and bring more sales.
Premium or gated assets are typically longer form, and/or more time-intensive pieces that don't exist on a blog. They might be used to generate leads or contacts, or for brand-building purposes. These are typically created by the dedicated long-form content creator if your team is large enough to have one, but sometimes bloggers get involved too, as blog posts are good testing grounds for what performs well and is thus worth investing in.
Businesses in different neighborhoods will apply local marketing tactics to different consumer segments, as identified by socio-economic standing, demographic composition, and purchasing values—but assuming that a business’ location was planned as opposed to random, the consumers who live in the neighborhood are already the types of consumers who are interested in that business.
A great way for you to get attendees to notice your business is to set up a canopy tent with your brand on it. There are many websites that allow you to create a custom tent for outdoor events. Anyone who is walking by will be able to see your business, which could draw in any curious prospects. This will help you build brand visibility, and can get your business name out in front of local customers.
You could get even more specific by narrowing it down to customer base. Is there a specific group of clients you tend to serve? Try including that in your long-tail key phrase. For example: “SEO agency for non-profits in Albuquerque NM.” That’s a key phrase you’re a lot more likely to rank for. Not to mention it will also attract way more targeted, organic traffic than a broad key phrase like “SEO agency.”
Content marketing requires manpower, so the first step is figuring out who is going to head up the program. There's no one-size-fits-all for team structure -- it depends largely on the size of your company, your marketing team, and your budget. But if we assume that those three things are interlinked, as they often are, I can provide you with some frameworks based off of other content marketing-focused companies' structures. These should help you hire the right people, and have them "sitting" in the right spot in your organization.
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