We have the team. We have the technology. Now we have to actually start "doing" the content marketing. In this blog post, we can't cover every manner of sin when it comes to creating content, but we can go over 1) the types of content assets a content marketing team could be creating to demonstrate the breadth of the opportunities available to the content marketing team, and 2) who should be involved in creating those assets.

Businesses in different neighborhoods will apply local marketing tactics to different consumer segments, as identified by socio-economic standing, demographic composition, and purchasing values—but assuming that a business’ location was planned as opposed to random, the consumers who live in the neighborhood are already the types of consumers who are interested in that business.
At my own company we’ve used content marketing to grow more than 1,000% over the past year. Potential clients find our content, find value in it, and by the time they contact us they’re already convinced they want to work with us. We don’t have to engage in any high pressure sales tactics, it’s merely a matter of working out details, signing an agreement, and getting started. The trust that usually needs to be built up during an extensive sales cycle has already been created before we know the potential client exists.
This knowledge will also enable a local business to make specific offers to the various groups in its community. Restaurants, for example, can extend special lunch-time deals to employees of local organizations or businesses. Restaurants and stores can provide particular incentives for local students with good grades, or who participate in community service. Stores can partner with other stores in their shopping centers—for example, offering a 10-percent discount to surrounding employees (who walk right past your doors every day on the way to work). (See also Promotional Marketing)
With a marketing team size of around 18, your content marketing team will be staffed with all the same roles -- bloggers, long-form content creators, SEO specialists, designers -- just multiplied. Aim to have three bloggers on staff, and two employees for each of the other roles. It's wise to have one of those bloggers have expertise in editing, too, so there's someone dedicated to maintaining content quality as output increases.

At this stage of growth, it's also time to assign dedicated leadership to your content marketing team -- unless you want two dozen people reporting to the CMO. Many organizations hire a Director of Content, VP of Content, Chief Content Officer, or Editor-in-Chief to lead the entire content marketing team. This individual sets the vision for the team, secures budget, hires the right talent, contributes content ideas, solves for growth, and helps coordinate with other leaders across the marketing organization so content marketing doesn't become too siloed.
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